Hair coloring

Permanent and Semi-Permanent Hair Coloring: What Are the Differences?

It's not always easy to distinguish between permanent hair color and semi-permanent hair color.

Permanent Hair Coloring: Advantages and Disadvantages

Permanent hair color is also known as oxidation hair color because it contains hydrogen peroxide and ammonia in particular. It's a color meant to last, as the name suggests, because it will penetrate the hair fiber irreversibly. The only way to get rid of it forever is to let your hair grow out.
The fusion of color with the oxidant will open the scales of your hair so that synthetic pigments can modify its natural composition. Upon rinsing, the pigments will be "trapped" by the scales of your hair, which will close. Permanent hair color can damage and sensitize the hair, especially if abused and not properly maintained. It usually takes about 4 to 6 weeks before you have to repeat the process, depending on the frequency of washing that will release your color as well as the growth of your roots.
It's important to know that a color can fix very well on one person and much less on another. There are many factors that make your color last more or less, starting with the condition of your hair. The more damaged your hair is, the less it will hold the color. There are also other factors that make the color last less, such as dry hair, straighteners, and other sources of heat, the sun, the composition of the products you put on them, like alcohol hair spray.

Advantages

  • Permanent color is the only one that can cover all gray hairs.
  • It's the only one that can make a radical change in your hair color, like going blonde if you're brunette and vice versa, red, blue, copper, whatever you want!
  • It adds shine and highlights that can be accentuated in natural light. Color can truly add character and structure to your face by playing with nuances of shades and colors to enhance it.
  • Colors are evolving, and brands are offering ammonia-free colors, which are much less harsh on the hair and scalp.

Disadvantages

  • Don't forget that it strongly sensitizes your hair and should not be overused.
  • When you get into the cycle of dyeing your hair, it's hard to get rid of it. It requires maintenance; you have to take care of it at home. The word "permanent" is deceptive: in reality, the color doesn't last a lifetime; you have to readjust its intensity or touch up the roots regularly.
  • The composition can cause allergies or eczema. Sensitive people are often advised to test the product on the skin and wait 24 hours to avoid potential risks.

Semi-Permanent Hair Color: Advantages and Disadvantages

Compared to permanent coloring, semi-permanent hair color is significantly less aggressive because it only stays on the surface of the hair and does not penetrate the hair fiber.

Advantages

  • Semi-permanent hair color evens out the base color and makes it shinier.
  • It doesn't damage the hair and leaves it as it was when you started because it doesn't contain ammonia.
  • This is the perfect solution if you just want to tone and maintain your natural color.

Disadvantages

  • It barely covers gray hair, if at all.
  • Unlike permanent color, you can't make major color changes from one extreme to another unless you've done bleaching. You can do whatever you want, including trendy pastel colors.
  • It also requires a lot of maintenance, as it needs to be done quite frequently if you want the color to always be intense.
  • The color changes very quickly, and you'll notice a loss of intensity with each wash.
  • It can also leave unwanted reflections even after several washes.